Terabyte Volume Engine

Available with Diskeeper Professional edition, the Terabyte Volume Engine (TVE), which is a specialized defragmentation engine for today's large NTFS volumes (60 GB or larger in size),is designed to efficiently handle volumes containing millions of files. Note that the TVE is only used on NTFS volumes.

The TVE is fully integrated into both Automatic and Manual defragmentation.

The TVE operates differently from the standard Diskeeper defragmentation engines since it is designed specifically for very large volumes. For example, when the TVE is defragmenting a volume, the graphic display usually shown in the Volume Map tab is replaced with numerical data showing the progress of the defragmentation operation. This reduction in system resource usage pays off in lower CPU consumption and faster defragmentation of very large volumes.

Also, the TVE may or may not examine the whole volume in a single process. This saves system memory resources.

Here is a description of the information displayed in the Volume Map area when the TVE is defragmenting a volume:

File record examinations

This is the number of times a file record (MFT record) was examined and is basically used to show that progress is occurring. The number may be larger than the number of file records on the volume if a full job runs, because a file record may be examined more than once, or it may be smaller than the number of file records on the volume if the job didn't run to completion.

Fragmented file examinations

This is the number of the above file record examinations that located fragmented files. Again, a file may be examined more than once during a defragmentation job, so this number will not match the number of fragmented files reported in the Statistics portion of the Volume Details section.

Fragments eliminated

This is the number of fragments that were eliminated by the TVE. It may not match the number of fragments reported in the Statistics portion of the Volume Details section because the job was only partially completed, or because files became more or less fragmented as the result of other processes during the period when the engine ran.

Contiguous file examinations

This is the number of the above file record examinations that located contiguous files that could be moved to help consolidate free space. Not all files on the volume are candidates for this action, so the number will most likely be far less than the number of contiguous files in the Statistics portion of the Volume Details section.

Files that could not be processed

This is the number of times that a file couldn't be moved. The most common reasons for a file not moving are:

The Windows application event log stores the reason(s) for the first fifty files that could not be processed.